An Obituary ~ this one is Joel's - 2015
The Lost Words Blessing

The Case for Adding New & Younger Members

All of you know that I continue to hope for a larger number of women in our Salon.
Much of that hope is based on reasons I've stated before, one being having a congenial number present when some of us are otherwise engaged, whether it be travel or illness, etc.

Another reason, and perhaps a better one, stems from my reading about Co-housing and what makes them work. Multi-generational groups fare much better over time than those limited to Olders.  We're more likely to age successfully in place if there is a range of ages, strengths, abilities, etc.  In such groups, generally, Elders' responsibilities for various maintenance tasks decrease as their ages and abilities decrease. Without multi-generational partners more of this work has to be 'hired out', so to speak.

“The real fountain of youth is the fountain with youth.”  -Marc Freedman

This thought comes from an article I found online, called "The Real Trick to Staying Young Forever"
I confess, I was triggered by the 'young forever' part and started to read so that I could argue.  

It mentions a study begun in 1938 (not a typo) that tracked 268 Harvard sophomores for EIGHTY years.  This study found that relationships, especially those with multi-generations, produced the greatest physical and mental health.

These relationships don't just benefit we Elders, though.
Another 40 year study in Hawaii followed 700 children from the age of 1 to age 40 and focused on resilience.
Their short definition of resilience was defined as "why some kids thrive under adversity and others do not".
You can guess their results and why it's included here.

The article also talks about how the generations came to be so separate; the consequences of this separation, and how we might get back together.
And it touches on a Cleveland Elder living community that offers an artist-in-residence program for young musicians which exchanges housing for concerts and interaction at meals, etc.  The article also mentions in brief several other programs designed to connect young people with Elders.

"Almost eight in 10 people between 18 and 24 and the over-65s want life to slow down, and social care
for older people remains the second-highest concern for 18-to-34-year-olds.
The issue is not whether they have anything in common, but how to connect them."    -from the article

Yes, this is me proselytizing. I hope you enjoy the article.   Kate W.   

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